1401 Avocado Avenue, Suite 301
Newport Beach, CA 92660

1401 Avocado Avenue, Suite 301
Newport Beach, CA 92660

moc.yregruscitsalpradyap%40tcatnoc

(949)755-0575

Reconstruction

What is Breast Reconstruction?

Breast reconstruction is a procedure used to rebuild and restore breasts that have been compromised due to a mastectomy procedure or other serious health issues. There are a variety of methods used to help restore the breasts in a way that is suitable to the patient’s desires for traits such as shape, size, and feel. Although the final result cannot exactly replicate the original or natural breasts of a patient, there are successful solutions that can be achieved.

Who is a Breast Reconstruction Candidate?

Women who have undergone surgical treatments, such as mastectomy or lumpectomy, to treat cancer or other serious illness are the most common candidates for breast reconstruction. With varying amounts of breast tissue and skin removed during a mastectomy, with possible need for or history of radiation, the best techniques will be chosen for the particular situation.

Illustration

Breast Reconstruction Surgery Pre-Op and Post-Op

How do I prepare for my Breast Reconstruction?

Your surgeon will give you specific instruction on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins, and medications. If you smoke, plan to quit at least two weeks be­fore your surgery and not to resume for at least six weeks after your surgery. If you develop a cold or infection of any kind, your surgery will probably be postponed. Whether your surgery is done on an outpatient or inpatient basis you should arrange for someone to drive you home and assist with your care for a day or two after you leave the hospital, if needed.

What happens during a Breast Reconstruction?

Anesthesia is used to treat pain during the operation. Although the condition of your skin, muscle, breast tissue, and post-surgical areas determine which techniques will be used for your particular operation, there are general guidelines for each reconstruction. These include rebuilding the breast through techniques such as:
● Tissue expansion and breast implants●Latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction●TRAM or DIEP flap reconstruction
Some patient circumstances may necessitate multiple treatments to achieve full reconstruction of the breast. Most commonly, procedures involving tissue expansion and breast implants may need additional treatments for optimal results.

What is the Breast Reconstruction Recovery Process?

You can expect to feel swelling, pain, and irritation at the incision sites directly following your procedure. Common side effects of surgery, such as feeling tired and sore, are natural for breast reconstruction. You may be given an elastic bandage or medical support bra after the bandages are removed. This will provide needed support to reduce swelling and speed recovery. Try to avoid excessive stress, motion, force, and abrasion to incision sites in the weeks following your procedure.

What are the Risks of a Breast Reconstruction?

Post-operative complications such as bleeding, infection, and blood clots are rare, but can occur. Poor healing, which results in conspicuous scars, may necessitate a second operation. Smokers should be advised to stop, as smoking may increase the risk of complications and delay healing. Other risks include decreased sensation, asymmetry, poor cosmetic outcome, and need for future revisions or reoperations. If using implants there is risk for capsular contracture, rupture, or malposition. You can reduce your risk of complications by closely following your surgeon’s instructions before and after the surgery, especially with regard to when and how you should resume physical activity.

Reconstruction Procedures Pre-Op and Post-OpScar Revision, Earlobe Repair, Skin Cancer

What are Reconstruction Procedures such as Scar Revision, Earlobe Repair, Skin Cancer?

Reconstruction is a surgery used to rebuild and restore body parts that have been compromised due to previous operation, trauma, or cancer. The goal is to restore the body without compromising its function and to improve the aesthetics as will in the process.

Who is a Reconstruction Procedure Candidate?

Patients who have undergone surgical treatments, such as previous operations with a scar as a result or who are currently in need of skin cancer excision or have a history of trauma are most common candidates for reconstruction.

How do I prepare for my Reconstruction Procedure (scar revision, earlobe repair, skin cancer)?

Your surgeon will give you specific instruction on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins, and medications. If you smoke, plan to quit at least two weeks be­fore your surgery and not to resume for at least six weeks after your surgery. If you develop a cold or infection of any kind, your surgery will probably be postponed. Usually scar revision or earlobe repair are done under local anesthesia, but if IV sedation or general anesthesia is required for skin cancers, you should arrange for someone to drive you home and assist with your care for a day or two after you leave the hospital, if needed.

What happens during a Reconstruction Procedure?

Anesthesia used could be either local or sedation or general anesthesia depending on the severity of the defect expected and location of the problem. The defect caused buy removal of a scar or tumor of from trauma is treated with rearranging tissue or by borrowing tissue from other parts of the body. Tissue is sutured into place and a dressing is applied for days before unveiling. Some instances may require multiple operations to achieve full symmetry or appropriate aesthetics.

What is the Reconstruction Procedure Recovery Process?

You can expect to feel swelling, pain, and irritation at the incision sites directly following your procedure. Try to avoid excessive stress, motion, force, and abrasion to incision sites in the weeks following your procedure.

What are the risks of my Reconstruction Procedure (scar revision, earlobe repair, skin cancer)?

Post-operative complications such as bleeding, infection, and blood clots are rare, but can occur. Poor healing, which results in conspicuous scars, may necessitate a second operation. Smokers should be advised to stop, as smoking may increase the risk of complications and delay healing. Other risks include decreased sensation, asymmetry, poor cosmetic outcome, and need for future revisions or reoperations. You can reduce your risk of complications by closely following your surgeon’s instructions before and after the surgery, especially with regard to when and how you should resume physical activity.